Another successful KestrelCam season has come to an end. We hope you enjoy this photographic overview of the nest at The Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds of Prey in Boise, Idaho.

The KestrelCams are made possible by our partnership with

Cornell Lab of Ornithology Bosch
nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image nestbox image
6030 observations logged this season.

KestrelCam updates!

Sign up to receive KestrelCam updates by email!


Welcome to the 2014 KestrelCams season.

Donate to support our work

If you enjoy watching the Kestrel Cam, please support our work to recover threatened and endangered birds of prey. Your donation will:

  • Conserve American Kestrels and other birds of prey
  • Educate people about why birds of prey must be protected
  • Build a healthy environment for future generations

Your tax-deductible donation will be used efficiently and effectively. We take pride in being a common-sense, elbow-grease, no-frills, hands-on group of dedicated professionals. We tackle only those projects for which we are the most qualified and where a definite need exists. And we always strive to leave a lasting result.

Twitter stream

Why is a light inside the nestbox at night?

The interior camera uses infrared light to "see" in the dark and low lighting.  The exterior camera also detects infrared light, hence the impression of a "lit" nestbox at night, but the light is invisible to kestrels and humans so the kestrels have a dark box for sleeping.

 

How do I identify the male and female kestrel?

Females have alternating black and orange bars across their tail, back, and wing feathers, while males have blue wing feathers and only one thick black bar near the end of their tail feathers.

american kestrel male female examples

Check out the fantastic kestrel photos donated by our sponsoring professional photographers in our Kestrel Photo Gallery!

Are American Kestrel populations declining in my region?

On average, the North American breeding population of American Kestrels has declined by an estimated 50% from 1966 to 2012 according to USGS Breeding Bird Survey data.  However, population trends vary by geographic region, such as New England, where the population has declined by estimated 88%.  Check out our Population Declines webpage to see the trend in your region.

Buy or build your own American Kestrel nesting box!

Buying or building your own kestrel nesting box gives you the opportunity to enjoy the colorful and charismatic American Kestrel up close.  It also allows you to contribute to two critical functions for kestrel conservation.

1) Installing kestrel boxes creates nesting habitat for this cavity-limited species (kestrels don't build nests and will not nest without a sufficient cavity!)

2) Monitoring kestrel boxes (counting eggs and nestlings during the nesting season) and entering data onto the Partnership website produces information critical for kestrel research and conservation planning.

Ready to get started?
- Buy a kestrel box!
- Build a kestrel box!
- Install and monitor your kestrel box!
- Create your Partner Profile and enter your nestbox monitoring data!

Learn more about American Kestrels

Check out our American Kestrel illustrated life cycle!

Find technical information at The Peregrine Fund's Global Raptor Information Network!

Visit the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's All About Birds section on the American Kestrel!

Stream a nestcam into your home or work!

Read this first!  KestrelCams and nestcams: guidelines and configuration (PDF)

Ready to purchase a nestcam?  Contact our sponsoring partner!  Spy on a Bird LLC sells nestcams custom configured for nestboxes and gives 15% discounts to our partners!

Want to embed the KestrelCam feeds on your website?  We encourage our partners to do so and the embedding codes can be accessed on Livestream's webpages:

Interior KestrelCam

Exterior KestrelCam

Credits to our partners

Bringing the fascinating world of nesting American Kestrels to you with our KestrelCams is made possible by our partnership with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Bosch Security Systems.  We thank Charles Eldermire, director of Cornell's Bird Cams, for providing the ad-free streaming service, and Willem Ryan, Steve Tangert, and Matt Thomas for the camera donations and technical expertise.  We also thank Bob Anderson of the Raptor Resource Project (and founder of the famous Decorah Bald Eagle cam!) for his early encouragement and technical expertise.